Tax Warrior Chronicles

Protecting Your Heirs from Taxes and Creditors After the SECURE Act

Posted on Fri, Jan 29, 2021

By: Elizabeth M. K. Witko, MAcc, MSF, and Robert N. Polans, CPA, MT, PFS

 

The tax impact of the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement (SECURE) Act’s 10-year limited stretch can be a “keep you up at night” concern for individuals who have amassed substantial qualified retirement accounts. Often, these individuals have a substantial portion of their investment portfolios accumulating and growing in tax-deferred retirement accounts, and as a result of the SECURE Act, could be passing down a massive income tax liability to their heirs.

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Updated IRS Life Expectancy Tables Mean Smaller RMDs in 2022

Posted on Thu, Dec 03, 2020

By: Elizabeth Witko, MAcc, MSF, and Robert N. Polans, CPA, MT, PFS

 

On November 6, 2020, the IRS issued final regulations containing new life expectancy tables to be used for determining Required Minimum Distributions (“RMDs”). These new tables are effective for RMDs beginning on January 1, 2022. The old tables will still apply for 2021 and no RMDs were required for 2020 due to the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. After reviewing improvements in mortality since RMD life expectancy tables were last updated in 2002, the IRS provided for an overall moderate reduction of RMDs utilizing these newly updated tables.

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The SECURE Act - Significant Changes for IRAs and 401(k)s – Part II

Posted on Fri, Jan 03, 2020

By: Beth Gaasbeck, CPA, MBA and Robert N. Polans, CPA, MT, PFS

 

Welcome to Part II of our two-part blog discussing the SECURE Act and its impact on retirement and estate planning.  The Act was signed by the President on December 20, 2019, and is effective as of January 1, 2020. Today’s focus is on the not-so-good parts of the Act.

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SCOTUS Rules in Favor of Kaestner Trust in NC State Tax Nexus Case

Posted on Wed, Jun 26, 2019

By: Rachel Kieser, CPA, MT

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Advantages of Naming Spouse as Sole Beneficiary of IRAs

Posted on Tue, Nov 04, 2014

All named beneficiaries of a decedent's IRA can receive a distribution from the decedent's IRAs. However, a surviving spouse who is the designated sole beneficiary of the decedent's IRA has two unique options that are not available to other beneficiaries. The surviving spouse may: (1) roll over the decedent's IRA into an IRA established in the spouse's own name ("spousal rollover"), or (2) elect to treat the decedent's IRA as the surviving spouse's own IRA ("election").  The surviving spouse is treated as if she had funded the IRA with either of these options.

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Distinguishing Between Legitimate and Sham Trusts – It’s Not That Easy!

Posted on Mon, Sep 29, 2014
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